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Podcast 17 AD – Heroic Striking

Podcast 17 AD – Heroic Striking

This episode Luke starts a conversation around the pending voice actor strike and why voice actors differ from the rest of the staff. Andy discusses the perception of what it is to be a gamer and Tim gives us a rundown on the changes to Destiny that came with The Taken King.

It’s adventure time! Come on, grab your friends… no not there… that’s inappropriate!

 

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Opening Music by Juliano Zucarelli
Closing music is SMASH! by Starbomb

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There are two things I love in life… playing games and my family. I work three jobs; one to pay the bills, another as a video game designer at C117 Games, and, of course, here – at Another Dungeon.

I own almost every console since the Atari 7800 and am proud of my extensive collection of games. I’m more of a single or coop player but I do dabble in multiplayer on the odd occasion. Tabletop wise I prefer strategic games like Five Tribes or Small World. If you want to have a game or just chat feel free to add me, PM me or email me.

  • Dave C Haldane

    VAG requests – I think it’s great voice actors have a union to help them fight for adequate compensation however, with no knowledge of what their pay is currently like, I don’t know whether they are currently being fairly paid or not. That said I don’t think the comparison to movie actors or writers is entirely fair/balanced. A writer, for example, has a huge impact on the success of a film or TV series whereas I would argue that the inclusion of a particular voice actor in a game doesn’t have a huge impact on the success or failure of a game.

    In Davey World a voice actor / motion capture actor should have a contract with appropriate compensation for the job they do – as a once off payment. It’s totally reasonable to expect stunt coordinators, transparency in contract (you will be expected to yell, cry, call someone a cunt, wear tight fitting clothes for mocap, etc.), and the other things but, in my mind, these are things you negotiate when takling on the job.

    The success of a project is the compilation of a number of things. The presentation, how it’s put together, the story, the acting… everything. In video games there’s one important element not apparent in film or tv too which is the gameplay. Many would argue this is the most crucial component to the success or failure of a game and is an area where the voice actor would typically have no impact whatsoever.

    Put Meryl Streep in a movie and her name will be a draw card. Her acting will usually be exemplary and, as a film’s success is determined by the acting/story/shots, is a decent measure for success. I don’t feel the same can be said for voice actors or even MOCAP actors in games.

    tl;dr – I think voice actors (and even actors in movies) should get fair contracts but I think they should be one off payments unless their role will have a significant impact on the success or failure of the project. The game developers themselves have a much larger impact on what will make the game a success and they should be the ones to benefit from a project well executed.

  • Dave C Haldane

    Gamers – I think there’s a key distinction to make when talking about gamers and that’s what a “gamer” is. To me a gamer is someone who identifies themselves as a gamer. Much like a cinephile or a audiophile as opposed to just a normal person who watches films, TV, listens to music, or plays games.

    The old lady on the bus isn’t necessarily a gamer – she’s just a person who happens to play Candy Crush on her phone. I play games as my primary form of entertainment (board and video) and even I wouldn’t call myself a gamer. I think it’s because I don’t use that as a community based thing to identify who I am. My sister used to spend most of her free time watching TV shows yet she never told anyone she was a “TV watcher”. I watch an inordinate amount of Star Trek but I’d still not call myself a Trekkie.

    There’s this strange culteral thing about gaming that, I believe, stems from what you were talking about. The public perception of a gamer is of a social awkward person who, in lieu of the ability to socially interact properly, flags themselves as a gamer and will defend it with everything they’ve got. The difficulty with gaming is that the perception of the “nerds” extends to everything to do with the industry rather than just staying with those few who are fat, solitary, keyboard warrior, teenagers playing alone in their rooms. Then again, if I said I was working on a Star Trek film it could be something of “Interstellar” quality (not the best sci fi movie but recognisable enough to make my pint 🙂 ) yet people would still associated my work with the nasaly nerd stereotype of a “Trekkie”. That’s kinda how I feel people treat gaming. They treat it as though self identifying keybaord warrior gamers are the norm for an entire multi billion dollar industry.

    Much like gay marriage, climate change, and the rest… I believe this is a generational thing that will disappear as time progresses. In 30 years our kids (or their kids) will look back on this (hopefully via a retrospective Another Dungeon article) and wonder what the fuck was wrong with us.

    It was interesting to hear Luke’s impression of this. I don’t think the attitude is restricted to his generation as it’s exactly the way I feel and respond – however I do think he’s right that it’s the norm. Having been on the receiving end of much ridicule for my hobby and desired profession I can see how my gen would have become defensive and feel a need for a shared identity as “a gamer” however I think it is something that will disappear over time. Gamers will become like cinephiles or audiophiles – people who wish to dientify themselves with their hobby and go out of their way to become a little more “expert”

  • Dave C Haldane

    Gamers – I think there’s a key distinction to make when talking about gamers and that’s what a “gamer” is. To me a gamer is someone who identifies themselves as a gamer. Much like a cinephile or a audiophile as opposed to just a normal person who watches films, TV, listens to music, or plays games.

    The old lady on the bus isn’t necessarily a gamer – she’s just a person who happens to play Candy Crush on her phone. I play games as my primary form of entertainment (board and video) and even I wouldn’t call myself a gamer. I think it’s because I don’t use that as a community based thing to identify who I am. My sister used to spend most of her free time watching TV shows yet she never told anyone she was a “TV watcher”. I watch an inordinate amount of Star Trek but I’d still not call myself a Trekkie.

    There’s this strange culteral thing about gaming that, I believe, stems from what you were talking about. The public perception of a gamer is of a social awkward person who, in lieu of the ability to socially interact properly, flags themselves as a gamer and will defend it with everything they’ve got. The difficulty with gaming is that the perception of the “nerds” extends to everything to do with the industry rather than just staying with those few who are fat, solitary, keyboard warrior, teenagers playing alone in their rooms. Then again, if I said I was working on a Star Trek film it could be something of “Interstellar” quality (not the best sci fi movie but recognisable enough to make my pint 🙂 ) yet people would still associated my work with the nasaly nerd stereotype of a “Trekkie”. That’s kinda how I feel people treat gaming. They treat it as though self identifying keybaord warrior gamers are the norm for an entire multi billion dollar industry.

    Much like gay marriage, climate change, and the rest… I believe this is a generational thing that will disappear as time progresses. In 30 years our kids (or their kids) will look back on this (hopefully via a retrospective Another Dungeon article) and wonder what the fuck was wrong with us.

    It was interesting to hear Luke’s impression of this. I don’t think the attitude is restricted to his generation as it’s exactly the way I feel and respond – however I do think he’s right that it’s the norm. Having been on the receiving end of much ridicule for my hobby and desired profession I can see how my gen would have become defensive and feel a need for a shared identity as “a gamer” however I think it is something that will disappear over time. Gamers will become like cinephiles or audiophiles – people who wish to dientify themselves with their hobby and go out of their way to become a little more “expert”

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